17 Tips for Taking Charge After A Disruptive Event

Back to BugOut Blog

17 Tips for Taking Charge After A Disruptive Event

“Oh no! Now what?  A disruptive event has just occurred in my area and what do I do?  I know that I have prepared an emergency kit and can survive for a week or two but what do I do now?  I am confused and can’t think. Help me!”

Although this is a fictional scenario, those might likely be the thoughts that run through your mind following an earthquake, hurricane, flood, wildfire or other natural disaster. Those thoughts and worse will jump to the forefront if the disruptive event is a pandemic, nuclear event, or civil unrest where your life may be in danger.

While some may think that the likelihood of such a disaster landing on your doorstep is low, it could happen. That is why you prepare, right?

Given that a disruptive event might occur without warning, what will do you do?  Here are some tips and possible solutions to the “OH NO! What do I do now?” dilemma.

Take Stock of the Situation

Tip #1:  Are you and your family safe? Can you keep yourselves warm, fed, and out of harm’s way?  Remember, being prepared for a disaster is part of your basic responsibility. If you have been caught unprepared, this will be more of a challenge than if you’re able to be completely self-sufficient.

Tip #2: If it appears that you are safe inside your home, determine what the conditions are outdoors.  Is it even safe to go outside or should you stay put and shelter in place?

Tip #3:  Do you have a way to let family and loved ones outside of your home know that you are safe?  What communication systems are functional (telephone, cell phone, texting, internet, shortwave radio)?

Tip #4:  Are you facing a true emergency or do you need help immediately?  If you are okay and the event is a major disaster, place a sign in your window or on your door that say’s “OK”.  If you need medical assistance of other help, put up a sign that says “HELP” or “INJURED”.

Prepare Your “In the Moment” Mindset

Tip #5:  Assume that you are going to be on your own for a while. Local services will be overwhelmed and you should only look to them for help in true life or death emergencies. Don’t call 911 to ask for information, report power outages, or to pass on information that is not life or death in nature.

Tip #6:  Plan to subsist on stored food, water, and supplies.  If the situation is dire, transportation systems and power systems will be only marginally functional if they are functional at all.  The shelves of the stores, if they are even open, will be empty within hours.

Tip #7:  Disasters bring out the best and the worst in people. Be patient with those who do not respond well, and work hard to ensure that your own response is positive and constructive.

Tip #8:  After a disaster or disruptive event, there is a natural tendency to blame someone for the event. Remember, disasters are usually no one’s fault, and are an unavoidable part of simply living in our world. Focus on the things you can control such as helping your community heal, staying positive, and moving forward.

Tip #9: Roll with the punches and make the best of a bad situation.  Stay secure in the knowledge that things can only get better.

This article was written by Gaye Levy and the complete article can be viewed here:

http://www.backdoorsurvival.com/tips-for-taking-charge-after-a-disruptive-event/

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

Share this post

Back to BugOut Blog